Jun 172017
 
It's been called the 'next oil'. In the coming decades, the supply of water has the potential to influence geopolitics, diplomacy and even conflict. By Bryan Lufkin 16 June 2017 The 2008 James Bond film Quantum of Solace pits 007 against an evil criminal syndicate bent on global domination. Sounds par for the course… but this particular network of baddies isn’t using lasers or missiles to cause havoc. Grand Challenges In this special series, Future Now takes a close look at the biggest, most important issues we face in the 21st Century. For two months, we'll bring you insight from leading scientists, technologists, entrepreneurs and influencers to help you make sense of the challenges we face in today's rapidly evolving world. No, the Quantum organisation has a uniquely dastardly plan: seizing control of Bolivia’s water supply. While the evil syndicate’s role in the film might not be entirely realistic, this piece of fiction does raise a scenario that is worth considering seriously: what would happen if a country’s water supply was cut off? What would be the global fallout? Think about it: sure, we need water to survive. But it also fuels a country’s commerce, trade, innovation and economic success. This has been the case for time immemorial, from the Nile in Ancient Egypt to the Amazon in the Brazilian rainforest. While bodies of water typically help form natural borders of countries, several nations tend to share access to rivers or lakes – the Nile runs through nearly a dozen countries alone, for example. Given how conflict-prone humankind is, it’s surprising there haven't been more dust-ups of a “hydro-political” nature.   Bodies of water have always formed natural boundaries between countries, forcing people to figure out ways to share water peaceably. (Credit: Getty Images)   Experts agree: if there was no access to water, there would be no world peace. That’s why one of the grand challenges of the next few decades could be maintaining this ultra-sensitive stasis of water management. In the 21st Century, freshwater supplies are drying up, climate change is raising sea levels and altering borders, explosive population growth is straining world resources, and global hyper-nationalism is testing diplomatic relations. Meanwhile, water demand is expected to go up 55% between 2000 and 2050. In the coming century, in terms of its value as a global resource, it’s been described as “the next oil." So what can we do to guarantee global access to (more…)
Jul 272015
 
House Passes Bill to Prohibit States From Labelling GMOs! Ask Your Senators to Oppose Any Bill That Prohibits Labeling of Genetically Engineered Foods! Should You Decide If You Want to Eat GMOs? Ask Your Senators to Oppose Any Bill Prohibiting GMO Labels! http://act.foodandwaterwatch.org/site/MessageViewer?dlv_id=65883&em_id=58581.0 The House of Representatives passed a bill last week that will prohibit states from labelling genetically engineered foods! Can you ask your Senators to oppose any bill that tries to take away labeling for genetically engineered foods? Why is this important? Well, in poll after poll, more than 90% of people want food to be labelled if it contains genetically engineered ingredients. Several states have already passed laws requiring labelling, including Vermont, which will require labels on all foods starting next summer,unless this terrible bill passes through Congress and is signed into law by President Obama. It’s really important that your Senators hear from you, so they’re not misled by the Big Food Corporations that want to prohibit GMO labeling. The lobbyists for Big Food have been busy on Capitol Hill, and it appears that many members of Congress may be confused by the language in the “Safe and Accurate Food Labelling Act.” It sounds good doesn’t it? We call it the Denying Americans the Right to Know Act (DARK Act). We get a lot of questions about why we need labelling for GMOs, even from staff of members of Congress! Our answers are below. We hope you’ll contact your Senators today, and give them the information below, so they can vote the right way and protect your right to know what’s in your food. Question: What is a genetically engineered food or GMO? Answer: A genetically engineered food is a plant or animal that has been changed by taking genes from one species and inserting them into the DNA of another species or altering the DNA in a way that could never happen through traditional cross-breeding or in nature. Question: Aren’t genetically engineered foods safe? Answer: The approval process for new GMO crops in the U.S. is extremely weak and relies solely on the safety tests done by the corporations that are creating these crops. Right now, most crops are approved by federal regulators under the “generally recognized as safe” provision, which means that if a GMO corn variety looks and “acts” like the non-GMO version of corn, it is approved. Question: But don’t farmers need genetically engineered foods to feed the (more…)
Jul 102011
 
Published in Rolling Stone National Affairs SAM PANTHAKY/AFP/Getty Images We take water for granted. And why not? We turn a tap and out it comes. But that’s going to have to change, says author Alex Prud’homme. As he explains in a new book, The Ripple Effect, the basic problem is this: the quantity of water in the world is finite, but demand is everywhere on the rise. As oil was in the 20th century – the key resource, a focus of tension, even conflict – so water will be of the 21st, as states, countries, and industries compete over the ever-more-precious resource. So we need to figure out how to use it more sustainably. But that’s not all. In the United States fresh water is under threat from new kinds of barely understood pollutants, from pesticides to pharmaceuticals, and from a last-century infrastructure of pipes, dams, levees, sewage plants that urgently needs upgrading. All this and (much) more you’ll learn from The Ripple Effect, a book that will forever change the way you think about what comes out of your faucet. (A film based on the book, titled Last Call at the Oasis, produced by the same folks who brought us An Inconvenient Truth and Food Inc., is in preparation.) Rolling Stone recently got Prud’homme on the phone to talk about thirst, waste and the fate of fresh water. Reading the book, I was really struck by how fundamental water is to so many processes. Right. Water is considered an “axis resource,” meaning it’s the resource that underlies all others. So whether you’re building a computer chip, or growing crops, or generating power, all these things require lots of water. But there’s only a finite amount of water, and now resources are butting up against each other. America’s Water: The Looming Crisis (Book Excerpt: The Ripple Effect) At the same time, you point out, we waste a lot of water. We’re using our water supplies unsustainably. In America, we can turn the tap on at any time of day and get as much water as we want at any temperature for as long as we want. And, consequently, we take it for granted. Which is unusual: In most places in the world it’s very difficult to get water on a regular basis. Water is virtually free. Is that a big part of why we take it for granted? Yes. There’s not a great economic incentive (more…)
Jul 012011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyMt-Gwi41Q Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Jul 012011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti4IrJyd8JI Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Jul 012011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmLgbMQE1Qc Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Jun 292011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hD0OJSoe2OI&NR=1 Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Jun 282011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2jDKSdFNVk&NR=1 Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Jun 282011
 
Fascinating movie spans the globe to reveal recent discoveries about water, the most amazing yet least studied substance in the world. Witness as researchers, scientists, philosophers and theologians try to understand this unique liquid and all its miraculous properties still waiting to be discovered. It was there that Heisenberg and Bohr came to Einstein to tell him it looked like the minds of the researchers were affecting the results of the experiments. Mind was inexorably linked to matter. Einstein later said, “Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.” In this amazing film, Water, the Great Mystery, we can see that science has made a quantum leap into understanding how mind can be recorded by the most simple element in nature (water) and on the periodic table: H20. If water has memory, and its main component being hydrogen, then the whole universe would have memory. Hydrogen was born between 100 and 1,000 seconds after the big bang. It makes up 75% of the known mass of the universe and now is part of the missing mass equation.   httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqA7IuLjqMk&NR=1 Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
May 062011
 
Updated: May 06, 2011 12:58 PM © BananaStock/Thinkstock By Rachel Bertsche From Green Goes Simple You’ve probably given some thought to your carbon footprint, but what about your water footprint? According to the EPA, the average family of four uses 400 gallons of water per day. That’s the equivalent of using more than an entire swimming pool’s worth of water every two months! Wondering where those 100 gallons per person come from? Consider this: A bathroom faucet runs at about 2 gallons of water per minute. The shower uses about 4 gallons per minute. And a single toilet flush can use as much as 7 gallons. “That 400 gallons is just direct water use,” says Kai Olson-Sawyer, a water research and policy analyst who runs the online water conservation project H2O Conserve. “It doesn’t even account for our indirect, or virtual, water use, like the water used by the production of food, electricity and more.” Curious how your water intake stacks up against the average American? Plug your info into H2O Conserve’s Water Footprint Calculator, and then make these easy changes that will help you save some water — and some money on your next water bill. 1. Fix all leaks, especially in the toilet. “Leaks are huge water wasters,” says Olson-Sawyer. “If you notice any drips, take care of them immediately.” Flushing the toilet is, on average, the largest use of household water, and a leaky toilet can waste up to 200 gallons per day. Olson-Sawyer recommends looking into a water audit for your home, which is when a professional comes into your home to identify sources of leaks and water waste. “You might spend a little bit of money to shore up your plumbing, but you’ll stop leaks that will cost you in the long run,” he says. 2. Turn off the water when you aren’t using it. It sounds simple and obvious, but letting the water run while you brush your teeth, shave or wash dishes is a common mistake. “It speaks to the general mentality that we have an unlimited supply of water,” says Olson-Sawyer. “But it’s about being conscious of your actions and your water use.” Turning off the faucet while shaving or brushing your teeth can save more than 200 gallons of water per month! 3. Make your water do double duty. If you look for them, you can find a number of ways to make your (more…)