Mar 022017
 
This story depicts the conditions of global waste, the most dangerous invisible threat to mankind that exists. Millions can be lifted out of poverty without ruining the planet with the help of clean sustainable energy. Practical Action (formerly ITDG), Power to the People, 2002 What Is It About Waste? Is It Waste Or Is It Waste? Waste, Just look at it. It’s the stuff we put in the little plastic bag lining the kitchen “garbage can”, then take to the big black garbage can container out at the curb. Listen, subconsciously for the sound of the garbage truck then again subconsciously sigh when we hear the dumping and the truck driving to the next garbage container. Most of the people fail to see it at all – the eye tends to subtract it – but those who do notice usually don’t pay any attention. It’s “Out sight out of mind.” According to the United Nation. ‘Wastes’ are substance or objects, which are disposed of or are intended to be disposed of or are required to be disposed of by the provisions of national law. In the modern language of garbage “Waste”, has become synonymous with “Trash” – that is, waste has come to mean the perceived dirty, icky, unhelpful, useless, valueless material that’s left over when we’re done with something. By this definition, waste is the foul stuff we wish would just disappear. “Out of Sight, Out of Mind” Our entire elaborate waste collection, transportation and disposal system has for a century been built around this “just make it go away” concept, An illusion for which Americans happily (or at least regularly) pay either through taxes or monthly bills. Waste in this sort of discussion is always to be defined as a cost, a negative and a burden – an inevitable, unpleasant fact of life, for which the only remedy is removal. I apply a different definition to the word “Waste”, the one we at Green Fire emphasize – the original verb form of the word as in ‘to waste” something. By this definition the nature of the discussion changes, because “to waste” implies the object being wasted has value, be it time, resources or manpower. After all, you can’t “Waste” something that has no value. The intro to WALL-E displays an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth. An image that in today’s world grows millions of tons every day. An (more…)
Jan 192017
 
Ocean Legacy has a task not even Sisyphean would envy: picking up, sorting and recycling the vast amount of plastic that ends up on our shores. This article is from Hakai Magazine, an online publication about science and society in coastal ecosystems. Read more stories like this at hakaimagazine.com.       On a sunny afternoon in September, a barge roughly the size of a dump truck pulls into Delta, British Columbia, piled high with marine debris. Foam, plastic bottles, frayed rope—all of it hand-picked by dozens of volunteers from the western shores of Vancouver Island and stashed inside 200 giant white bags. “Too bad that ain’t gold,” a bystander remarks from the dock. “You just wait,” replies Chloé Dubois, standing on deck, “one day it will be.” Dubois, the executive director of Ocean Legacy, one of a handful of organizations that took part in what was dubbed the largest marine debris cleanup in Canada over the summer of 2016, is startlingly passionate about plastic—something people throw away every single day. The month before the barge’s arrival, I joined Ocean Legacy’s cleanup of Mquqwin/Brooks Peninsula Provincial Park and saw Dubois work 12-hour days sorting foam, dragging giant necklaces of buoys across the scorching sand, and moving crinkly sacks so full of water bottles they dwarfed her meter-and-a-half height. She cleans with full knowledge that the beaches will be covered in plastic again in a few weeks’ time. Read Full Article Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)
Nov 172016
 
A large accumulation of small defeats The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well Landfills release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. Photo: Bloomberg The toxic haze that enveloped Delhi for two weeks after Diwali has diminished. But it would be foolhardy to think the moment has passed. How do we go on from here, knowing that next year, too, farmers will burn crop stubble, people will burn garbage and burst Diwali firecrackers, diesel generators will remain in use, environmentally harmful industry practices will prevail and private vehicles will still be the preferred means of transport? The causes of October’s smog highlight the intersectional nature of pollution in cities—how one mode of pollution interacts with and worsens another, which is why it is difficult to come up with a quick fix to bad air. The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well. India produces about 62 million tonnes of solid waste annually, of which 75-80% is collected, and only 22-28% is treated. The rest lands up in open dumpyards and landfills or is burnt. According to a 2016 study by the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, on Delhi’s air quality, the burning of municipal solid waste accounts for 7-8% of particulate matter pollution. Landfills, on the other hand, release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. The Swachh Bharat (Urban) scheme focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene, with scant attention being paid to the solid waste coagulating unchecked in landfills. The National Urban Sanitation Policy 2008 was concerned with access to sanitation facilities for the urban poor, but landfills remained outside that conversation. Landfills were limited to the ambit of the erstwhile Municipal Solid Wastes (Management and Handling Rules), 2000. Every big city usually has at least one landfill. Delhi has four. Mumbai has three. Chennai and Kolkata have two each. Bengaluru had two before they were shut down after community protests. There is something very sobering about the vastness of a landfill, the spectre of city after city struggling with the problem. But the bigger issue (more…)
Nov 152016
 
Green Fire and Landfill Mining Landfill Mining – LFM – has the potential to have significant economic and environmental impacts. Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a landfill mining company. Green Fire is a passionate multi disciplinary professional organization specializing in carefully engineered waste remediation and reclamation. We could be considered a high tech company with the innovations we are working with but a better term would be an all tech company. Green Fire carefully choses the best technology to use for any given application based on properly engineered and tested processes. Every project is a little different. This is why Green Fire is made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts. Landfill Mining As available land and reusable resources become increasingly scarce, options to harness these from alternative sources become more sought after. One of the options available is Landfill Mining (LFM). LFM is commonly understood to be the extraction of waste from a landfill site after that site has closed and is no longer accepting waste. Green Fire is preemptive in its approach, we want to be there before it closes, Our mission is to not only recover the land but reclaim and reuse the waste. Green Fire intercepts and stems the flow of waste to the landfill. The concept of LFM is not new: There have been examples cited since the later 1940s and it is likely that earlier, unrecorded activities took place. LMF is not a practice unique to one country, region or has any specific strategy that determines whether it should take place or not. Traditionally the reasons for LFM are often unique to the site itself and there are specific factors that may lead to a LFM operation. Green Fire is mining the proportion of the world’s waste still being disposed of in open landfills. Open landfills have the potential for significant resources to be recovered post-disposal. In the future old landfills are likely to be considered as exploitable material resources. Green Fire; LFM, Economics and Humanity While there are a number of reasons for Green Fire LFM, It appears that there (more…)
Nov 142016
 
Wasting Away Waste And Landfill Landfills are the old form of waste treatment and are still commonly used in most places around the world. Since the advent of agriculture, humans have had to deal with garbage disposal. Yesterday’s dump was a pit or hill on the outskirts of town that played host to disease-carrying rodents, insects, and dangerous objects. Today, the number of “open landfills” in the world directly effect half of the world’s population, 3.5 billion people. 1 My study of waste and garbage has given me an insight into how civilizations handled waste through history. A Brief History of the Beginning The first recorded find of a “landfill” was in North America. Archaeological studies shows a clan of Native Americans in what is now Colorado produced an average of 5.3 pounds of waste a day. That was in 6500BC. Americans today produce about 5.4 pounds of waste per day. 2 Then in 500 BC, Athens Greece organized the first municipal dump in western world. Regulations required waste to be dumped at least a mile from the city limits. The New Testament of Bible refers to waste Jerusalem Palestine, in the Valley of Gehenna also called Sheoal in the New Testament of the Bible "Though I descent into Sheol, thou art there." Sheoal was apparently a dump outside of the city of that periodically burned. It became synonymous with "hell." The Threat of Waste Throughout history trash has played a continuous but invisible role. The diseases spawned during the middle ages devastated the world’s population but our history books talk about it and the rats but never do they talk about the garbage and the waste as having any responsibility for the diseases. 3 How Much Waste is too Much Current global Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation levels are approximately 1.3 billion tonnes per year, and are expected to increase to approximately 2.2 billion tonnes per year by 2025. This represents a significant increase in per capita waste generation rates, from 1.2 kg (2.64 lb) to 1.42 kg (3.12 lb) per person per day in the next fifteen years. However, global averages are broad estimates only as rates vary considerably by region, country, city, and even within cities. 4 MSW generation rates are influenced by economic development, the degree of industrialization, public habits, and local climate. Generally, the higher the economic development and rate of urbanization, the greater the (more…)
Oct 282016
 
The Global Situation Landfill gases have an influence on climate change. The major components are CO2 and methane, both of which are greenhouse gas. In terms of global warming potential, methane is over 25 times more detrimental to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. Landfills are the third largest source of methane in the US. Biomass derived CO and CO 2 from landfills is not “counted” as contributing to global warming by the world organizations. Globally, trash released nearly 800 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent in 2010 — about 11 percent of all methane generated by humans. The United States had the highest total quantity of methane emissions from landfills in 2010: almost 130 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent. China was a distant second, with 47 million then Mexico, Russia, Turkey, Indonesia, Canada, the United Kingdom, Brazil and India, according to the Global Methane Initiative, an international partnership of government and private groups working to reduce methane emissions. Our landfill problems contribute directly to climate change. As organic material such as food scraps break down in a landfill, they eventually release methane into the atmosphere. Methane from landfill sites account for 12% of total global methane emissions and almost 5% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Personal Situation We all take out our trash and feel lighter and cleaner. This statement includes everyone in the world. But at the landfill, the food and yard waste that trash contains is decomposing and releasing methane, a greenhouse gas that’s 28 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Landfill gas contributes to smog, worsening health problems like asthma. The Solution Green Fire does not try to capture the gases of the landfill, we change the conditions of the dump to reduce landfill greenhouse gas emissions. Green Fire processes all hydrocarbons on the landfill reducing them to useful fuels. These fuels are used to generate electricity to feed back into the local grid. The byproduct from the gasification process is carbon. Carbon can be used to "quite" a landfill by spreading it on fires and spreading it to absorb a great many toxins. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation has developed new ways to reclaim and recycle waste by producing fuels to generate electricity and reusable raw materials from landfill waste. Green Fire and its "Green" and "renewable" resources doesn't produce pollution in the process of reclamation and making energy. Our "Green Power" has no environmentally-damaging (more…)
Oct 262016
 
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation Green Fire is a passionate multi-disciplinary organization specializing in carefully engineered waste Remediation and Reclamation. A number of years ago our group came together with a focus on developing ways of economically resolving the global epidemic of health risks facing society from its mounting waste. The result is Green fire Engineered Reclamation. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is an engineering company, made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts focused on the world's waste problem, initially the open landfills. We pride ourselves on our ability as a collective group to integrate all appropriate technologies, Green Fire's as well as third party technologies. We integrate technologies to build the best possible solution for the landfill and the local community. We are focused on landfill mining. With our technologies we are able to reclaim and re-purpose the landfill by removing the raw and useful materials from what has been rejected as waste, producing only inert material to be used for new purposes. Here is the problem we are addressing. Open Dumpsites Open Dumpsites are a global problem. There are approximately 350 recognized open dump sites globally. They receive roughly 40% of the world’s waste and they serve about 3.5 – 4 billion people. That's half of the world's population. The 50 biggest dumpsites directly affect the daily lives of 64 million people, a population the size of France. There have been and still are international calls for solutions to solve this escalating global health emergency. Green Fire has the solution.   What we do is process the waste through the “application of heat.” Green Fire has a patented technology several years in development and with several million dollars invested.. It is now ready to be taken into useful production. The Green Fire Technology is an efficient electrochemical system powered by electricity that produces an intense field of radiant energy, a plasma, that causes the breaking apart of the molecular bonds of solid, liquid and gaseous compounds of materials both hazardous and nonhazardous. Our process is a two stage process. The first transforms the organic (carbon-based) materials into an ultra-clean, synthetic gas, called syngas. The clean syngas is then converted into transportation fuels such as ethanol and diesel, or industrial products like hydrogen and methanol. The syngas is used as a substitute for natural gas for heating and is used for electrical generation. After the first phase, the waste (more…)
Feb 182016
 
Here is the problem we are addressing. Open Dumpsites Open Dumpsites are a global problem. There are approximately 350 recognized open dump sites globally. They receive roughly 40% of the world’s waste and they serve about 3.5 – 4 billion people. That's half of the world's population. The 50 biggest dumpsites directly affect the daily lives of 64 million people, a population the size of France, and indirectly affect half the worlds population There have been and still are international calls for solutions to solve this escalating global health emergency. Green Fire has the solution. While the risk of disease and illness to millions of people living in the immediate vicinity of open dumpsites is cause for concern in its own right, the impact of the gases and toxins being released into the atmosphere by burning the waste has global consequences. Our intent is to achieve a coordinated response to the issue through a global alliance of organizations capable of delivering real change. Unless we do, the problem will exponentially accelerate as the global population increases We are Green Fire Green Fire is a passionate multi-disciplinary organization specializing in carefully engineered waste Remediation and Reclamation. A number of years ago our group came together with a focus on developing ways of economically resolving the global epidemic of health risks facing society from waste. The result is Green fire Engineered Reclamation. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is an engineering company, made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts focused on the world's waste problem initially the open landfills. We pride ourselves on our ability as a collective group to integrate all appropriate technologies, Green Fire's as well as third party technologies. We integrate technologies to build the best possible solution for the landfill and the local community. We are focused on landfill mining.. With our technologies we are able to reclaim and re-purpose landfill real-estate by first removing the raw and useful materials from what has been rejected and secondly generating power from the remainder leaving only inert material to be used for manufacturing. What we do is process the waste through the “application of heat.” Green Fire has a patented technology several years in development and with several million dollars invested.. It is now ready to be taken into useful production. The Green Fire Technology is an efficient electrochemical system powered by electricity that produces an intense field of radiant (more…)