Oct 072017
 
Startling Facts About Ocean Pollution You Need to Know Right Now One of the major environmental issues that we get to hear about today is about ocean pollution, and how it is taking its toll on marine life. This problem is no more a thing of tomorrow. The denial mode might seem comforting, but the fact is, we are already at the receiving end. According to the data compiled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), approximately 1.4 billion lbs of trash is dumped in the oceans every year. On an average, 8 million items of marine litter are disposed in oceans every single year; approximately 5 million of which are either thrown off board or lost during a storm. It is estimated that 70 percent of the total marine litter is deposited at the seabed; the remaining 30 percent either keeps floating in the ocean or is washed ashore (beach trash). Interestingly, pollution caused by marine transportation only accounts for 10 percent of the total ocean pollution; even that is down from 12 percent in 1990. As a part of the annual International Coastal Cleanup campaign, 598,000 volunteers collected over 9 million lbs of trash from various sites across the world in 2011. In oceanography, 'ocean pollution' is described as pollution of ocean water due to accidental, or deliberate dumping of harmful materials, such as crude oil, ore, or toxic materials, in it. Around 2 million plastic bottles are used in the United States every 5 minutes. Marine debris include a wide range of items – right from cigarette butts and plastic bottles to abandoned fishing nets and oil spilled by vessels plying in these oceans. Marine animals either ingest these debris by mistake or get entangled in them, and end up dying in most of the cases. Shorebirds and other terrestrial species are directly or indirectly dependent on the marine biome, and therefore, are vulnerable to ocean pollution. In their annual Beach Sweep report, the 'Clean Ocean Action' comes up with a list of unusual items found in beach trash — which they call the Roster of Ridiculous. In 2011, this list had some really unusual things, including car bumpers, hair curlers, wax teeth, fire extinguisher, and even a water cooler. Approximately 80 percent of the total ocean pollution is attributed to land-based activities, i.e., non-point sources, like untreated sewage, industrial waste, agricultural runoff, surface runoff, etc. (more…)
Nov 152016
 
Green Fire and Landfill Mining Landfill Mining – LFM – has the potential to have significant economic and environmental impacts. Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a landfill mining company. Green Fire is a passionate multi disciplinary professional organization specializing in carefully engineered waste remediation and reclamation. We could be considered a high tech company with the innovations we are working with but a better term would be an all tech company. Green Fire carefully choses the best technology to use for any given application based on properly engineered and tested processes. Every project is a little different. This is why Green Fire is made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts. Landfill Mining As available land and reusable resources become increasingly scarce, options to harness these from alternative sources become more sought after. One of the options available is Landfill Mining (LFM). LFM is commonly understood to be the extraction of waste from a landfill site after that site has closed and is no longer accepting waste. Green Fire is preemptive in its approach, we want to be there before it closes, Our mission is to not only recover the land but reclaim and reuse the waste. Green Fire intercepts and stems the flow of waste to the landfill. The concept of LFM is not new: There have been examples cited since the later 1940s and it is likely that earlier, unrecorded activities took place. LMF is not a practice unique to one country, region or has any specific strategy that determines whether it should take place or not. Traditionally the reasons for LFM are often unique to the site itself and there are specific factors that may lead to a LFM operation. Green Fire is mining the proportion of the world’s waste still being disposed of in open landfills. Open landfills have the potential for significant resources to be recovered post-disposal. In the future old landfills are likely to be considered as exploitable material resources. Green Fire; LFM, Economics and Humanity While there are a number of reasons for Green Fire LFM, It appears that there (more…)
Mar 252016
 
A business magnate – His mission is to be the first entrepreneur on Mars with the purpose of setting human civilization on the path to the colonization of the solar system. SpaceX: Dragon 2 will look like a real alien spaceship Elon was born an entrepreneur into a family of entrepreneurs. His mother, Maye (Haldeman), a model from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada,was a dietitian and a beautiful fashion model. His father, Errol, was an electromechanical engineer and what a family member described as a "serial entrepreneur." Yes, Errol was from Mars and Maye was from Venus, you might guess as to how it was going to work out. From these parents he was cast into society a virtual “stranger in a strange land”. A nerd, yes a NERD, carefully schooled and coached by his parents into exceptionalism. An “exceptional” nerd living in a South African culture which at the time was a “manly man” type of culture. As you might expect, he was abused and beat by his school mates, finally thrown down a flight of stairs and hospitalized for a week. A nerd, at twelve, he used an artifact of a computer, Commodore VIC-20, wrote his first game and sold it for $400. The beginning of his own path of being a"Serial entrepreneur." He finished schooling in a private school, then ran away on his own to Canada and enrolled at Queen's University in Ontario and lived in a dormitory for foreign students. He graduated with degrees in economics and physics and went to Stanford on a full ride for two days, quit to start his first business Zip2, a web software company. It sold and Musk received $22 million for his share. Is he from Mars? He grew up in South Africa without ever really considering himself South African. Like the rest of his family, he was just passing through. The Musks were a race nearly as much as they were a family, with a specialized awareness of themselves as wanderers and adventurers. Every Musk is able to tell the story of forebears whose accomplishments serve as an inspiration and whose energy endures as an inheritance — a grandfather who won a race from Cape Town to Algiers; a great-grandmother who was the first female chiropractor in Canada; grandparents who were the first to fly from South Africa to Australia in a single-engine plane. An inside point of view. (more…)
Dec 232015
 
Report calls for alliance to solve escalating global health emergency threat posed to millions by open dumpsites Open dumpsites receive roughly 40% of the world’s waste and serve about 3.5 to 4 billion people Substantial rise in unregulated dumping of mobile devices, electronic appliances, medical and municipal waste accelerating scale of the threat and health risks Uncontrolled burning of waste releases gases and toxins into the atmosphere Open waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines more detrimental to life expectancy than malaria2 64 million people’s lives affected by world’s 50 largest dumpsites (equal to population of France)1 In addition to human/environmental impact, the financial cost of open dumpsites runs into the tens of billions $USD A new report presented at the ISWA World Congress today has revealed the global health emergency already affecting tens of millions of people worldwide is escalating in scale and impact. The report, published by the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) entitled ‘Wasted health, the tragic case of open dumps’, demonstrates how the problems of open dumpsites experienced in the developed world 40 years ago still exist in poor and emerging countries but are being additionally compounded by unprecedented new issues. These include the unregulated accumulation on a massive scale of discarded electronic and mobile devices, medical waste, and animal carcasses, which are routinely burnt. While the risk of disease and illness to millions of people living in the immediate vicinity of open dumpsites is cause for concern in its own right, the impact of the gases and toxins being released into the atmosphere by burning the waste has global consequences. The report concludes that without a coordinated response to the issue through a global alliance of organisations capable of delivering real change, the problem will only worsen and quickly. Read the full report here. Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)