Mar 022017
 
This story depicts the conditions of global waste, the most dangerous invisible threat to mankind that exists. Millions can be lifted out of poverty without ruining the planet with the help of clean sustainable energy. Practical Action (formerly ITDG), Power to the People, 2002 What Is It About Waste? Is It Waste Or Is It Waste? Waste, Just look at it. It’s the stuff we put in the little plastic bag lining the kitchen “garbage can”, then take to the big black garbage can container out at the curb. Listen, subconsciously for the sound of the garbage truck then again subconsciously sigh when we hear the dumping and the truck driving to the next garbage container. Most of the people fail to see it at all – the eye tends to subtract it – but those who do notice usually don’t pay any attention. It’s “Out sight out of mind.” According to the United Nation. ‘Wastes’ are substance or objects, which are disposed of or are intended to be disposed of or are required to be disposed of by the provisions of national law. In the modern language of garbage “Waste”, has become synonymous with “Trash” – that is, waste has come to mean the perceived dirty, icky, unhelpful, useless, valueless material that’s left over when we’re done with something. By this definition, waste is the foul stuff we wish would just disappear. “Out of Sight, Out of Mind” Our entire elaborate waste collection, transportation and disposal system has for a century been built around this “just make it go away” concept, An illusion for which Americans happily (or at least regularly) pay either through taxes or monthly bills. Waste in this sort of discussion is always to be defined as a cost, a negative and a burden – an inevitable, unpleasant fact of life, for which the only remedy is removal. I apply a different definition to the word “Waste”, the one we at Green Fire emphasize – the original verb form of the word as in ‘to waste” something. By this definition the nature of the discussion changes, because “to waste” implies the object being wasted has value, be it time, resources or manpower. After all, you can’t “Waste” something that has no value. The intro to WALL-E displays an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth. An image that in today’s world grows millions of tons every day. An (more…)
Apr 012016
 
This article summarizes three reports, McKinsey Global Institute Report, The World Bank Report and The Economist, on the global consumer and waste conditions and why Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is pursuing Landfill Mining. We are the only Engineering company in the world that can do what we do, reclaim the lost value that we have wasted. We estimate that between 2% and 5% of the consumer consumption growth in dollars is the cost in waste and that is just to store it in a landfill, mostly likely an open landfill. 1% of the population of the major cities pointed to in these reports are the people that live on landfill and half of those are Children of the Landfill. Links to the full reports are in the resource list at the end of this article and you should read through them to get the full picture. Summaries of reports: Global urban consumption is expected to grow by $23 trillion between 2015 and 2030 at an annual growth rate of 3.6%1. These are the projections made by McKinsey Global Institute’s new report Urban World: The Global Consumers to Watch. The report is based on the research that as world population growth slows, global consumption growth (the demand that fuels the world’s economic expansion), will depend heavily on how much each individual spends. Knowing which consumers are likely to be spending robustly, where they are, and what products and services they prefer to buy becomes even more important for companies, policy makers and investors. Until the turn of the century, more than half of global consumption growth came from an expanding number of consumers in the world. However, in the period to 2030, population increase will generate only 25% of global consumption growth with the rest coming from rising per capita consumption. By 2030, consumers in large cities will account for 81% of global consumption and generate 91% of global consumption growth from 2015 to 2030.   World Bank Report 2 The amount of garbage humans throw away is rising fast and won't peak this century without transformational changes in how we use and reuse materials, write former World Bank urban development specialist Dan Hoornweg and two colleagues. Hoornweg and co-author Perinaz Bhada-Tata expanded on their work from the 2012 World Bank report What a Waste: A Global Review of Solid Waste Management to estimate the trajectory of solid waste growth globally (more…)
Dec 022015
 
                  STORY HIGHLIGHTS Solid waste generation rates are rising fast, on pace to exceed 11 million tonnes per day by 2100, urban specialist Dan Hoornweg and his colleagues write in the journal Nature. That growth will eventually peak and begin to decline in different regions at different times, depending in part on population growth, waste reduction efforts, and changes in consumption. Until that happens, the rising amount of waste means rising costs for governments and environmental pressures. The amount of garbage humans throw away is rising fast and won't peak this century without transformational changes in how we use and reuse materials, write former World Bank urban development specialist Dan Hoornweg and two colleagues.  By 2100, they estimate, the growing global urban population will be producing three times as much waste as it does today. That level of waste carries serious consequences – physical and fiscal – for cities around the world.  Hoornweg and co-author Perinaz Bhada-Tata expanded on their work from the 2012 World Bank report What a Waste: A Global Review of Solid Waste Management to estimate the trajectory of solid waste growth globally and to determine when it might peak. In the earlier report, they warned that global solid waste generation was on pace to increase 70 percent by 2025, rising from more than 3.5 million tonnes per day in 2010 to more than 6 million tonnes per day by 2025. The waste from cities alone is already enough to fill a line of trash trucks 5,000 kilometers long every day. The global cost of dealing with all that trash is rising too: from $205 billion a year in 2010 to $375 billion by 2025, with the sharpest cost increases in developing countries. In the new article, appearing in the journal Nature, Hoornweg, Bhada-Tata, and Chris Kennedy forecast that if business continues as usual, solid waste generation rates will more than triple from today to exceed 11 million tonnes per day by 2100. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, where waste levels are the highest today at around 1.75 million tonnes per day but populations aren’t growing as quickly and waste reduction efforts are underway, are likely to see their trash levels peak by 2050 and then start to decline, the authors write. Asia-Pacific countries won't peak until 2075. How soon Sub-Saharan Africa's waste increase peaks will determine how soon the (more…)