Apr 112017
 
Land Department and MPKj officers visiting the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long. The site is being used to illegally dump rubbish and carry out open burning activities. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star ILLEGAL rubbish dumping and open burning at the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long are posing serious health problems for residents. Over the past 10 years, there have been about 10 illegal rubbish dumps in Bukit Enggang. The residents claimed this had made them fall sick and their children were coughing badly after inhaling smoke from the open burning. The illegal dumping problem has not been resolved despite residents’ many complaints and actions by the Kajang Municipal Council (MPKj). Sungai Long resident Yong Yew Hong, 53, who lived there for more than three years, said he jogged in Bukit Enggang every day. “At midnight every day a few rubbish and sand trucks filled with rubbish enter Bukit Enggang and come out empty,” said Yong when visiting the rubbish dump at Bukit Enggang. “There are about 10 rubbish dumps in the housing areas near Bukit Enggang where residents suffer from the foul smell and smoke from the burning of rubbish. “They start burning the rubbish in the evening every day. This causes the air in the housing area to be hazy. Another Sungai Long resident Lee Hui Leng, 34, said they were forced to close their windows and doors to keep the smoke out. “When my husband and I drove past the area one night, we noticed the people burning the rubbish with kerosene,” said Lee. Jogger Benny Ong, 74, said he had been exercising and jogging at Bukit Enggang for about 20 years. “Now Bukit Enggang is famous for illegal dumping. The foul smell and smoke from the rubbish dumps have kept joggers away. “There are food waste, broken furniture, development waste and many more at the rubbish dumps,” said Ong. Kajang Municipal councillor Lai Wai Chong said MPKj received 52 complaints from the residents in February and confiscated 12 vehicles. “Each offender was fined RM2,000 and their vehicles confiscated for a month. “We will return the vehicles to the offenders only after they pay up the fine,” he said, adding that the council would keep a 24-hour watch over the area to catch the culprits red-handed. Source: Open burning at illegal rubbish dumps a health risk for Bukit Enggang (more…)
Mar 092017
 
A small technology and innovation company based in Tanzania is working to create a healthier environment and produce more medical tools by re-using plastic waste as 3D printer filament. Using this recycled material, STICLab hopes to enhance the area’s health ecosystem by providing a range of medical tools and applications. And since Dar es Salaam, the city in which the company operates from, generates an estimated 400 tonnes of plastic waste in one day, STICLab is hoping to help the region’s environment, as well as its medical sector. In a project, named ReFabDar, similar to ALT LLC’s last year, STICLab is passionate about ‘fixing the mess we have created for ourselves.’ The company says the first step to doing that, is changing the perception of trash and finding a way to make value out of waste. Currently in Tanzania, the cost of 1kg of filament can rise above forty dollars. Focusing particularly on recycling plastic bottles, the aim for the company’s engineers has been to create new machines that turn this plastic waste into 3D filament, and then use that filament to innovate new products for the Tanzanian market. “Today, the plastic waste that is collected by waste pickers is then shipped freight to China,” said Adella Salum, Engineer, STICLab. “We need more local enterprises to recycle this waste. If we could just have ten percent of Dar’s plastic waste, we could make about a million medical tools a day.” Using its RETR3D 3D printer and Thunderhead filament extruder, the company’s vision is becoming a reality. Through the ReFabDar project, five feasible product markets have been established. While education items, spare parts, jewellery and consumer goods are all viable end-parts, STICLab sees healthcare as the field in which it can have the greatest impact. Tanzania is one of Africa’s worst affected areas for the spread of malaria – practically the entire country carries a high risk of infection. To properly diagnose malaria, doctors often use microscopes, which in poorer parts of the country are not always easy to come by. Having already 3D-printed a medical microscope, STICLab is hopeful the ReFabDar project can help to sufficiently detect and treat killer diseases, such as malaria, while cracking down on plastic waste. “We have laboratories where we conduct our research activities,” said Calista Emeda, Senior Research Scientist, National Institute for Medical Research. “We use microscopes in several activities while testing. Malaria is among the (more…)
Dec 112014
 
This is the basic information about the global economy. We all know that the global currencies, fiat currencies all of them, are going to collapse. If the currency budget bill in congress passes as it stand and the Dodd Frank bill is gutted, this will represent the first domino in the chain of events toward collapse. Watch this course. There are 24 clips from 2 minutes to 20 minutes long. You’ll be glad you did. The Crash Course has provided millions of viewers with the context for the massive changes now underway, as economic growth as we’ve known it is ending due to depleting resources. But it also offers real hope. Those individuals who take informed action today, while we still have time, can lower their exposure to these coming trends — and even discover a better way of life in the process. We’ll show you how.   Prepare your financial self and buy gold and silver now. Buy Gold Here Buy Gold Here Share this:FacebookLinkedInTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestReddit (more…)