Aug 212017
 
Sunday, August 20, 2017 TM, Trash ‘Mafia’ and Lack of Responsibility People all over Iran have long witnessed waste pickers going around cities carrying huge, filthy bags on their backs, diving in bins to salvage whatever they can sell or reuse. Though dirty, it is a well-paid job for bin divers and a lucrative business for those who run the show behind the scenes. Urban waste pickers operate legally in the developed world as their activities are monitored and their contribution to urban sanitation and lowering municipal costs cannot be denied. In fact, in 2008, they held the First World Conference on Waste Pickers in Bogota, Colombia, to facilitate global networking. The term “waste picker” was adopted then. However, waste picking is not at all monitored in Iran, allowing few people to run the business behind the scenes without dirtying their own hands. Officials have often expressed concern and sometimes laid out plans to tackle the problem. All words, no action. Acknowledging the problem, Mohammad Javad Haqshenas, member of the Tehran City Council, told Ensafnews that “mafias” operating in the shadows employ young children to do their bidding. Last week, Mozafar Alvandi, secretary of the National Body on the Convention of the Rights of the Child, revealed that waste pickers— 60% of whom  ostensibly are refugee children — have special cards issued by Tehran Municipality which allow them to search the trash bins! The cards, which surprisingly bear the stamp of TM, cost the holder 3 million rials (about $78.5) per month. This shocking statement means that city officials are not only aware of the hands behind the scenes, but also their activities, despite touting measures to tackle the problem. However, whenever the matter is brought up, TM absolves itself of any responsibility and blames contractors. Assuming city officials are right and there are contractors with no direct link to municipalities, another question comes up: Aren’t municipalities and local councils responsible for collecting and segregating waste in the first place? Or, should contractors not be monitored? Waste pickers, young and old, put their lives at risk by working in unsanitary environments and are deprived of a normal life so that a handful of greedy people line their pockets. Those who misuse children, whether contractors or municipal officials, must be stopped. For that to happen, legislators must reform a law that allows children to work only in workshops with fewer than (more…)
Aug 212017
 
Sunday, August 20, 2017 TM, Trash ‘Mafia’ and Lack of Responsibility People all over Iran have long witnessed waste pickers going around cities carrying huge, filthy bags on their backs, diving in bins to salvage whatever they can sell or reuse. Though dirty, it is a well-paid job for bin divers and a lucrative business for those who run the show behind the scenes. Urban waste pickers operate legally in the developed world as their activities are monitored and their contribution to urban sanitation and lowering municipal costs cannot be denied. In fact, in 2008, they held the First World Conference on Waste Pickers in Bogota, Colombia, to facilitate global networking. The term “waste picker” was adopted then. However, waste picking is not at all monitored in Iran, allowing few people to run the business behind the scenes without dirtying their own hands. Officials have often expressed concern and sometimes laid out plans to tackle the problem. All words, no action. Acknowledging the problem, Mohammad Javad Haqshenas, member of the Tehran City Council, told Ensafnews that “mafias” operating in the shadows employ young children to do their bidding. Last week, Mozafar Alvandi, secretary of the National Body on the Convention of the Rights of the Child, revealed that waste pickers— 60% of whom  ostensibly are refugee children — have special cards issued by Tehran Municipality which allow them to search the trash bins! The cards, which surprisingly bear the stamp of TM, cost the holder 3 million rials (about $78.5) per month. This shocking statement means that city officials are not only aware of the hands behind the scenes, but also their activities, despite touting measures to tackle the problem. However, whenever the matter is brought up, TM absolves itself of any responsibility and blames contractors. Assuming city officials are right and there are contractors with no direct link to municipalities, another question comes up: Aren’t municipalities and local councils responsible for collecting and segregating waste in the first place? Or, should contractors not be monitored? Waste pickers, young and old, put their lives at risk by working in unsanitary environments and are deprived of a normal life so that a handful of greedy people line their pockets. Those who misuse children, whether contractors or municipal officials, must be stopped. For that to happen, legislators must reform a law that allows children to work only in workshops with fewer than (more…)
Nov 152016
 
Green Fire and Landfill Mining Landfill Mining – LFM – has the potential to have significant economic and environmental impacts. Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a landfill mining company. Green Fire is a passionate multi disciplinary professional organization specializing in carefully engineered waste remediation and reclamation. We could be considered a high tech company with the innovations we are working with but a better term would be an all tech company. Green Fire carefully choses the best technology to use for any given application based on properly engineered and tested processes. Every project is a little different. This is why Green Fire is made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts. Landfill Mining As available land and reusable resources become increasingly scarce, options to harness these from alternative sources become more sought after. One of the options available is Landfill Mining (LFM). LFM is commonly understood to be the extraction of waste from a landfill site after that site has closed and is no longer accepting waste. Green Fire is preemptive in its approach, we want to be there before it closes, Our mission is to not only recover the land but reclaim and reuse the waste. Green Fire intercepts and stems the flow of waste to the landfill. The concept of LFM is not new: There have been examples cited since the later 1940s and it is likely that earlier, unrecorded activities took place. LMF is not a practice unique to one country, region or has any specific strategy that determines whether it should take place or not. Traditionally the reasons for LFM are often unique to the site itself and there are specific factors that may lead to a LFM operation. Green Fire is mining the proportion of the world’s waste still being disposed of in open landfills. Open landfills have the potential for significant resources to be recovered post-disposal. In the future old landfills are likely to be considered as exploitable material resources. Green Fire; LFM, Economics and Humanity While there are a number of reasons for Green Fire LFM, It appears that there (more…)