Jun 202011
 
National Inflation Association June 20, 2011 When the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) reported their latest consumer price index (CPI) inflation data last week, everybody in the mainstream media worked tirelessly to spin the data in order to proclaim that U.S. price inflation is not a problem. Most articles in the media reported that inflation slowed in May due to falling gas prices. The truth is, gas prices rose last month and U.S. price inflation is spiraling out of control. Price inflation based on the CPI on a year-over-year basis rose during the month of May to 3.57%, up from 3.16% in April, 2.68% in March, 2.11% in February, 1.63% in January, 1.5% in December, and 1.1% in November. The official rate of price inflation has more than tripled over the past 6 months. Yes, maybe the rate of year-over-year price inflation rose by slightly less in May over April, than it did in April over March, but this isn’t good news at all. This U.S. dollar is still rapidly losing its purchasing power and the rate at which it is declining in purchasing power is accelerating. On an unadjusted basis, gas prices rose 3.6% in the month of May. The media is reporting gas prices based on the BLS’s seasonal adjustments. Only with the BLS’s deceptive seasonal adjustments did gas prices decline by 2% in the month of May. The BLS’s seasonal adjustments will actually reverse starting in the month of July and add to reported gasoline prices. NIA predicts that come August when the BLS releases its July CPI report, the media will begin focusing on unadjusted gasoline prices because the unadjusted gain will be less than the adjusted one. The media always reports the data that supports their agenda and ignores the data that works against it. The media is obviously just saying what the U.S. government wants them to say. Larry Summers, a Keynesian economist who served for 5 years last decade as President of Harvard and was up until late-2010 director of President Obama’s White House National Economic Council, just said last week that, “the underlying rate of inflation is still trending downwards”. The media’s favorite economist Paul Krugman, a Keynesian who has an op-ed column in the New York Times, said last week that, “There’s really nothing here to shake my view that deflation, not inflation, is the threat.” Krugman, who has (more…)