Dec 082016
 
Informal workers do not receive social protection through work or legal protection through the state. Too often, these workers are unfairly stigmatized as “illegal”, “underground”, “black” or “grey” – but the vast majority are simply trying to earn a living against great odds. Informal workers may be self-employed in small unregistered enterprises; they may be sub-contracted workers or even work for wages in unprotected jobs. And they can be found in urban or rural settings, and in the richest as well as the poorest countries. In recent decades, informal employment has persisted or grown, emerging in unexpected places and in new guises. Today, half to three-quarters or more of non-agricultural workers in developing countries earn their living informally.     (more…)
Dec 052016
 
Green Fire On The Blockchain Green Fire has decided to change the world as you know it. We are moving together onto the blockchain. We have chosen “Green Fire Gold” (GFG) as the blockchain application name. GFG will be the first to take landfill mining and reclamation on to the blockchain. GFG is designed with next generation high load blockchain protocols, utilizing a blockchain design that improves functionality with each additional user, maximizing scalability and load performance. GFG includes your own private universal wallet that allows for immediate trading and exchange between all currencies and investment markets. The GFG blockchain is designed by the best in cryptocurrency development to create a coin and mainstream payment network usable by everyone in the world. The GFG universal wallet/coin combo can be used to manage your entire life and assets. Inside are a Universal Dapp store (decentralized application store), micro-services, micro-payments, smart contracts, universal exchange, universal payment system, and custom template decentralized app building, just to name a few. Understanding blockchain The Blockchain has become the default backbone for most new financial and business development. In essence, blockchain is a distributed database, or "timestamp server," as it was called by the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto in the paper that proposed bitcoin. The blockchain consists of blocks of data — each block is a timestamped batch of valid individual transactions and the hash of the previous block, creating a link between the two. Because each timestamp includes the previous timestamp in its hash, it forms a chain. Each new transaction must be authenticated across the distributed network of computers that form the blockchain before it can form the next block in the chain. GFG is developing a fully decentralized, leaderless DAO*, a Decentralized Autonomous Organization, and a fully distributed financial platform, OWNED BY THE PEOPLE WHO USE IT. GFG is using the MyCryptoWorld development platform to construct the GFG DAO. This platform develops on an advanced Ethereum blockchain. For the determination phase of implementation an interdisciplinary team of cryptocurrency, marketing and software veterans/enthusiasts around the globe have already started determining the intelligence that operates GFG. As soon the business determination is finished the whole system will be completely community/user driven and owned. From this point on the further evolution will be in the hands of all owners, using e-Governance/voting and other cutting edge tools to create consensus and run decisions. The GFG DAO is a (more…)
Dec 032016
 
Living In An Oligarchy The United State of Corporations USC We do not live in a democracy; we live in an oligarchy in every way but name. “government by the few, especially despotic power exercised by a small and privileged group for corrupt or selfish purposes” (Encyclopaedia Britannica). I’ve been waiting for people in high places to say it. They haven't, not even in the politics of today. An oligarchy is a form of government in which most of the political power effectively rests with a small segment of society, typically the people who have the most wealth, military strength, ruthlessness or political influence. The faces and voices of corporate owners today demonstrate the intransigent arrogance of the private institutional concentration of wealth and power of deregulated capitalism. The word "oligarchy" from the Greek words olígos, which means "few," and archo, which means "to rule". How Oligarchies Form Oligarchies are often controlled by a few powerful families whose children are raised and mentored to become inheritors of power, often at some sort of expense to those governed. In the case of the US the mechanism for the transformation to an oligarchy was the gradual accumulation of otherwise unchecked economic power. The latest mechanism to assist in this transformation was Citizens United. Oligarchy is a government by the rich for the rich. This power of the oligarchs may not always be exhibited openly. They generally prefer to remain a " power behind the throne", exerting control through economic means. Aristotle pioneered the use of the term as a synonym for “rule by the rich”, for which the exact term is plutocracy, A plutocracy is a government system where wealth is the principal basis of power (from the Greek ploutos meaning wealth). The term plutocracy is generally used to describe two unrelated phenomena. In writings about history, plutocracy is the political control of the state by an oligarchy of the wealthy. The second usage is a derogatory reference to the allegedly great and undue influence, the wealthy have on the political process in contemporary society. Again“Citizens United”, allowing for the best Government that money can buy. This influence is exerted positively (by financial "contributions", lobbying or in some cases, bribes) or negatively by refusing to financially support the government (refusing to pay taxes, threatening to move profitable industries elsewhere, etc), or both simultaneously. It can also be exerted that the owners and (more…)
Dec 012016
 
WOMENAID INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN OF THE WORLD INITIATIVE At the beginning of the 21st Century the children of the world are facing an undeclared assault upon their childhood as they suffer as a result of poverty, sexual exploitation, abuse as well as becoming the innocent victims of wars and the HIV/AIDS epidemics.Ten years ago the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted and the UN Secretary General has stated “we have no higher priority, no prouder achievement, than our work for the rights of children!” A few facts indicate it may be a little early “for we the people” to be proud of our achievement: 12 million children die before reaching their fifth year 100 million homeless children living in the streets around the world. 250,000 children die every week from diseases and malnutrition. 2 million children are objects of sexual abuse – child pornography and demand for  child prostitutes has increased globally. 20 million children are refugees or internally displaced in their homeland. 10 million children are child slaves Millions of girls are ‘missing’ as a result of foeticide, infanticide and neglect.    Millions of children are being orphaned as their parents die of AIDS related illnesses.The figures are unimaginable – already 11 million children in sub-Saharan Africa alone have been orphaned by the AIDS epidemic and reliable sources estimate that by 2010 there will be more than 30 million children orphaned by AIDS decimating parents. Millions more are being orphaned by poverty and war. The most defenceless victims of the savagery of war are children who are terrorized, often sexually abused, mutilated, forced to participate in killing or enrolled as child soldiers.Ethnic wars target children as they represent the future and in the last 10 years alone 1.5 million children have died in wars. Long after war is over children continue to be traumatized by their brutal experience and to be at risk as the hundreds of thousands of landmines left as a deadly legacy of war continue to maim or kill 800 children each month. Millions of children live their entire childhood in refugee camps. In many countries orphans are considered as outcasts.Throughout the world millions of children are kept in grossly sub-standard orphanages and other institutions, suffering from inadequate food, clothing, medical care, lack of stimulation and neglect.Medical care for orphans is limited and basic medical supplies are scarce. Every week 250,000 children die – victims of avoidable (more…)
Nov 282016
 
Slumscapes: How the world’s five biggest slums are shaping their futures | Reuters Slumscapes: How the world’s five biggest slums are shaping their futures Students attend the morning parade at a school in Kenya’s Kibera slums in capital Nairobi, September 21, 2015. Kenya’s president on Sunday urged teachers who have been on strike for about three weeks to return to work, saying their demand for a pay rise of up to 60 percent could not be met. REUTERS/Noor Khamis  By Paola Totaro     LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – As the United Nations prepares a 20-year plan to cope with the challenges of booming urbanization, residents of the world’s five biggest slums are battling to carve out a place in the cities of the future. Home to more than 900 million people worldwide – or nearly one in every seven people – the U.N. says slums are emerging spontaneously as a “dominant and distinct type of settlement” in the 21st century. Today one quarter of the world’s city dwellers live in slums – and they are there to stay. The U.N.’s 193 member states are set to adopt the first detailed road map to guide the growth of cities, towns and informal settlements, ensure they are sustainable, do not destroy the environment and protect the rights of the vulnerable. Held once every 20 years, the U.N.’s Habitat III conference comes at a time when, for the first time in history, more people live in cities than rural areas. In 2014, 54 percent of the global population lived in cities but by 2050, this is expected to rise to 66 percent. “We live in the urban century … when planned, built, and governed well, cities can be massive agents of positive change,” UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in a recent statement. “They can be catalysts for inclusion and powerhouses of equitable economic growth. They can help us protect the environment and limit climate change. That is why we need a new vision for urbanization.” The U.N.’s policy document, titled the New Urban Agenda, says there has been “significant” improvement in the quality of life for millions of city residents over the past two decades, but the pressures of population growth and rural-to-city migration are increasing dramatically. Billy Cobbett, director of the Cities Alliance partnership for poverty reduction and promoting sustainable cities, said urban growth in many parts of the world, particularly (more…)
Nov 172016
 
A large accumulation of small defeats The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well Landfills release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. Photo: Bloomberg The toxic haze that enveloped Delhi for two weeks after Diwali has diminished. But it would be foolhardy to think the moment has passed. How do we go on from here, knowing that next year, too, farmers will burn crop stubble, people will burn garbage and burst Diwali firecrackers, diesel generators will remain in use, environmentally harmful industry practices will prevail and private vehicles will still be the preferred means of transport? The causes of October’s smog highlight the intersectional nature of pollution in cities—how one mode of pollution interacts with and worsens another, which is why it is difficult to come up with a quick fix to bad air. The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well. India produces about 62 million tonnes of solid waste annually, of which 75-80% is collected, and only 22-28% is treated. The rest lands up in open dumpyards and landfills or is burnt. According to a 2016 study by the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, on Delhi’s air quality, the burning of municipal solid waste accounts for 7-8% of particulate matter pollution. Landfills, on the other hand, release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. The Swachh Bharat (Urban) scheme focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene, with scant attention being paid to the solid waste coagulating unchecked in landfills. The National Urban Sanitation Policy 2008 was concerned with access to sanitation facilities for the urban poor, but landfills remained outside that conversation. Landfills were limited to the ambit of the erstwhile Municipal Solid Wastes (Management and Handling Rules), 2000. Every big city usually has at least one landfill. Delhi has four. Mumbai has three. Chennai and Kolkata have two each. Bengaluru had two before they were shut down after community protests. There is something very sobering about the vastness of a landfill, the spectre of city after city struggling with the problem. But the bigger issue (more…)
Nov 162016
 
 Author Jacob Timp The United States House of Representatives has passed a nonbinding resolution calling for an adoption of “a national policy for technology to promote consumers' access to financial tools and online commerce to promote economic growth and consumer empowerment.” Why The Accelerated Interest? We have seen relatively little developments in the space of federal regulation on the Blockchain technology and digital currencies. A non-profit called Coin Center reached out to United States representatives communicating their concerns on the developing bill. The letters on issue are available on their website. In July, the declaration was introduced which calls the United State government to develop an updated domestic policy related to technology, specifically referencing cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology. The bill was introduced by United States Congressman Adam Kinzinger of Illinois and is sponsored by Congressman Tony Cardenas of California. Following statements from supporters, the resolution passed by a verbal vote earlier this week. The resolution is non-binding, which may be considered a half-measure, is a rather significant leap forward from Congress for the discussion on Blockchain and cryptocurrencies. The opening remarks on the bill stated: “The House of Representatives that the United States should adopt a national policy for technology to promote consumers’ access to financial tools and online commerce to promote economic growth and consumer empowerment.” The resolution occurred months after the United States House Committee on Energy and Commerce debated the technology. Notes from supporters on the floor demonstrated a very real interest in the issue among the House members. Congressman Michael Burgess of Texas, stated at the hearing: "There’s no doubt that Blockchain innovations are on the cutting edge today." What’s Next? We will see what the next step is for congress and whether or not they will pursue a more substantial bill development for digital currencies and the Blockchain technology. The next session will meet after November's United States elections. The non-leaning characteristics of the current resolution suggests that a new and updated bill may be released by Congress in the time following. Mike Prettyman, Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation For more information come to the website Children of the Landfill Project Green Fire Engineered Reclamation Join our active groups on Markethive Children of the Landfill Green Fire Engineered Reclamation (more…)
Nov 152016
 
Green Fire and Landfill Mining Landfill Mining – LFM – has the potential to have significant economic and environmental impacts. Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a landfill mining company. Green Fire is a passionate multi disciplinary professional organization specializing in carefully engineered waste remediation and reclamation. We could be considered a high tech company with the innovations we are working with but a better term would be an all tech company. Green Fire carefully choses the best technology to use for any given application based on properly engineered and tested processes. Every project is a little different. This is why Green Fire is made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts. Landfill Mining As available land and reusable resources become increasingly scarce, options to harness these from alternative sources become more sought after. One of the options available is Landfill Mining (LFM). LFM is commonly understood to be the extraction of waste from a landfill site after that site has closed and is no longer accepting waste. Green Fire is preemptive in its approach, we want to be there before it closes, Our mission is to not only recover the land but reclaim and reuse the waste. Green Fire intercepts and stems the flow of waste to the landfill. The concept of LFM is not new: There have been examples cited since the later 1940s and it is likely that earlier, unrecorded activities took place. LMF is not a practice unique to one country, region or has any specific strategy that determines whether it should take place or not. Traditionally the reasons for LFM are often unique to the site itself and there are specific factors that may lead to a LFM operation. Green Fire is mining the proportion of the world’s waste still being disposed of in open landfills. Open landfills have the potential for significant resources to be recovered post-disposal. In the future old landfills are likely to be considered as exploitable material resources. Green Fire; LFM, Economics and Humanity While there are a number of reasons for Green Fire LFM, It appears that there (more…)
Nov 142016
 
ISWA calls open dumps a ‘global health emergency’ A new report by the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) is highlighting the ‘global health emergency’ affecting tens of millions of people in developing countries who lack good sanitation infrastructure.    The front page of ‘Wasted health, the tragic case of open dumps’   The report, ‘Wasted health: The tragic case of dumpsites’, illustrates how the issues surrounding open dumpsites in the developed world 40 years ago are still prevalent in developing countries, but are also being compounded by unprecedented issues such as the unregulated accumulation of discarded electronics, mobile phones, and medical waste.  Some of the main problems identified in the report include: open dumpsites receive roughly 40 per cent of the world’s waste and serve about 3.5 to 4 billion people; there has been a substantial rise in unregulated dumping of mobile devices, electronic appliances, medical and municipal waste, accelerating the scale of the threat and health risks; uncontrolled burning of waste releases gases and toxins into the atmosphere; open waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines are more detrimental to life expectancy than malaria; 64 million people’s lives (equal to the population of France) are affected by world’s 50 largest dumpsites; in addition to the human and environmental impacts, the financial cost of open dumpsites runs into the tens of billions of US dollars. Report’s statistics In preparing the report, researchers analysed 373 toxic waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines, where, the report says, ‘an estimated 8.6 million people are at risk of exposure to lead, asbestos, hexavalent chromium and other hazardous materials’.  It continues: ‘Among those people at risk, the exposure could cause a loss of around 829,000 years of good health as a result of disease, disability or early death. In comparison, malaria in these countries, whose combined population is nearly 1.6 billion, causes the loss of 725,000 healthy years.’ The report also states that over 42 million tonnes of e-waste was generated in 2014 and a lack of trained labour and investment in recycling infrastructure has meant that much of the waste is simply dumped in open landfills, which can lead to further health issues as they can be burnt, exposing locals to dangerous pollutants, heavy metals, volatile compounds and soot. Call for a ‘global alliance’ to address the issue Releasing the report, Antonis Mavropoulos, Chairman of the ISWA Scientific and Technical Committee (more…)
Nov 142016
 
Wasting Away Waste And Landfill Landfills are the old form of waste treatment and are still commonly used in most places around the world. Since the advent of agriculture, humans have had to deal with garbage disposal. Yesterday’s dump was a pit or hill on the outskirts of town that played host to disease-carrying rodents, insects, and dangerous objects. Today, the number of “open landfills” in the world directly effect half of the world’s population, 3.5 billion people. 1 My study of waste and garbage has given me an insight into how civilizations handled waste through history. A Brief History of the Beginning The first recorded find of a “landfill” was in North America. Archaeological studies shows a clan of Native Americans in what is now Colorado produced an average of 5.3 pounds of waste a day. That was in 6500BC. Americans today produce about 5.4 pounds of waste per day. 2 Then in 500 BC, Athens Greece organized the first municipal dump in western world. Regulations required waste to be dumped at least a mile from the city limits. The New Testament of Bible refers to waste Jerusalem Palestine, in the Valley of Gehenna also called Sheoal in the New Testament of the Bible "Though I descent into Sheol, thou art there." Sheoal was apparently a dump outside of the city of that periodically burned. It became synonymous with "hell." The Threat of Waste Throughout history trash has played a continuous but invisible role. The diseases spawned during the middle ages devastated the world’s population but our history books talk about it and the rats but never do they talk about the garbage and the waste as having any responsibility for the diseases. 3 How Much Waste is too Much Current global Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation levels are approximately 1.3 billion tonnes per year, and are expected to increase to approximately 2.2 billion tonnes per year by 2025. This represents a significant increase in per capita waste generation rates, from 1.2 kg (2.64 lb) to 1.42 kg (3.12 lb) per person per day in the next fifteen years. However, global averages are broad estimates only as rates vary considerably by region, country, city, and even within cities. 4 MSW generation rates are influenced by economic development, the degree of industrialization, public habits, and local climate. Generally, the higher the economic development and rate of urbanization, the greater the (more…)